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Ashitaba for Pregnant Women and Nursing Moms

I have been asked a lot of questions about multiple health benefits of ashitaba in the past months. It seems that more people are being informed about this wonder plant. And as I mentioned in some comments published, I’m just glad to share good information and great news to readers online. Another questions that keeps on popping nowadays is if ashitaba can be any good to pregnant women and nursing moms. Is ashitaba safe to take? Does it have any side effects? Does it require prescription from the doctor? These are the questions we hope to be able to answer in this article.

Ashitaba for Pregnant Women and Nursing Moms

Before anything else, I’d also take this chance to report that I have seen bottles of DONG QUAI being sold now in GNC outlets you can find in malls. I have asked their staff about the benefits of dong quai and his answer was that it is beneficial for PMS symptoms in women. I believe I have tackled that topic before and you can read it here.

However, I don’t think that it’s the same Japanese Dong Quai or Ashitaba that they have there because ashitaba has a lot more benefits than solely that.

To recap, some of the benefits include improving your immunity system; relieving from Gl tract disorders, acute gastritis, chronic gastritis, carcinoma, melanoma, anemia and chronic fatigure; increasing production of sperm in men; treating asthma and common colds, hemorrhoids, and the list goes on.

But this just tells us that even other variety of plants belonging to the same family of dong quai (Angelica sinensis) are good for the health.

The Angelica Family has a history as a medicinal herb and health food since ancient times in both China and Japan. In Mainland China and Taiwan, the root of the Angelica Senesis has been popular for thousands of years and is frequently called the “Woman’s Ginseng.”

On the other hand, Japanese ASHITABA, has an anti-viral property that is not present in dong quai. The Japanese ASHITABA extract is a gentler medicine that can be taken frequently and at bed time without the stimulating effect that dong quai has, especially on women. Because it is gentler, it can be tolerated better by peri-menopausal women, pregnant women and nursing moms.

ASHITABA – Good for Lactagogue

Ashitaba is a useful lactagogue, that is, an agent which induces the secretion of mother’s milk. There is an anecdotal evidence from Japan concerning a cow that was fed with ashitaba and it recorded high milk production. By analogy, ashitaba could be used with mastitis or low milk production after delivery. Also, people in Hachi Jo Island in Japan believed that “ashitaba stimulates more milk in mothers but also animals.”

Furthermore, Dr. Toru Okuyama, Meiji University, College of Pharmacy
discussed that ashitaba has significant amounts of Vitamin B12 found in the
root and is beneficial for anemia and PMS symptoms which can include
breast tenderness, bloating, sleep disturbances and irritability.

FAQs

Is ashitaba safe to take?

Yes, ashitaba is safe to take during pregnancy and after pregnancy. The recommended dosage is four to six capsules a day as nutrition for pregnant woman’s nutrition. As the fetus grows, it consumes on nutrition from the mother’s body. So, pregnant women should take adequate balanced diet. This is to prevent miscarriage, premature delivery or handicapped babies diet to shortage of proper nutrition, especially if the expecting mom is short of vitamins, minerals and nourishment found in vegetables.

Here’s a nutritional fact comparison of Hachi Jo Island Ashitaba (100g edible parts) and other vegetables:

Does consuming ashitaba have any side effects?

Just like any other vegetable we take, ashitaba is a natural product containing only minerals and plant nutrition. It will only improve our health by stimulating our body.

Does it require prescription from the doctor?

At this point, please note that medicine is still different from food supplements. Ashitaba in any form is not considered as medicine but the latter. So we draw the difference: Medicine is prescribed by a doctor for specific treatment of some particular disease or illness with an expectation of direct or indirect effect.

On the other hand, food supplement is a kind of food that does not cause any side effect or any harmful effect, but supplies the necessary nourishment, prevent disorder of body and organ function and help them improve the natural power of recovery to maintain good health. Simply put, the answer is no. But if you’re experiencing harmful effects (i.e. allergic reactions), it’s best to consult with the doctor prior to taking it.

Is there harm if one stops consuming ashitaba?

There is no harm to stop halfway, but if you continue, the condition of your health will be enhanced, it will improve the function of the heart, liver, kidney, intestines and so on. As a result, the body’s natural recovering power or resistance against illness will strengthen.

 

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28 Comments

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